Wednesday, March 09, 2011

Bone-Creating Protein to Augment Maxillary Sinus Could Improve Dental Implant Success

Dr. Ulf Wikesjo

According to findings presented at the Academy of Osseointegration.
Dental implants, screws that anchor permanent prosthetic teeth, won't work if the bone in which they are anchored is too thin. Bone-thinning is a common cause and consequence following tooth loss. The current favored solution is to supplement the area with bone grafts to stabilize the implant base. But that technique is problematic "primarily because it involves additional surgeries to harvest the bone," said Dr. Ulf M.E. Wikesjö, Interim Associate Dean for Research and Enterprise in the GHSU College of Dental Medicine.

In animal studies, he and his team at the GHSU Laboratory for Applied Periodontal & Craniofacial Regeneration found that implanting bone morphogenetic protein in the sinus more new bone will form within four weeks than using conventional bone grafting at the same site.

"We found that BMP induced superior bone quality over that following bone grafts, which improves the chances for successful implants," Wikesjö said. "BMP is phenomenal, because it's a true, off-the-shelf product with ease of use that can produce real results, and it could be the new gold standard for this procedure."
A great new development. As more patients desire implant surgery as an alternative to removable prostheses, simpler, more predictable surgical materials, armamentaria and procedures will be devised.

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